Friday, March 18, 2016

Hiroshima Peace Memorial Museum


 
1. Just a short walk away from the site of the killer A-BOMB
at the Hiroshima Peace Memorial, you will reach the tranquil Museum
which is located beside the scenic river banks of downtown Hiroshima.




2. This huge Museum was built by architect Kenzo Tange in 1955.
It is surprisingly, very different from the Atomic Museum in Nagasaki.
This made our time very worthwhile to visit these 2 museums to
see much difference in their exhibits and historical records.



3. The exterior ambiance looks very prominent outside 
with the dancing fountains by the landscaped plants that 
looked like delicious red and white cabbages.




4. They make good salads. Are they real cabbages?




WARNING:
There Are Gory & Scary Graphic
Photographs In This Post.
You get nightmares, 
it is your problem!





5. Many visitors are local Japanese folks from other cities.
They have many patient guides to conduct the tours
around the museum.



6. The red ball marks where the A-BOMB exploded
in the mid air on 6 August 1945.
The whole city area of Hiroshima was burnt and devastated
killing over a total of 140,000 adults, children and infants.




7. The wall exhibits the actual site photograph after the atomic bomb 
had exploded and flattened the city of Hiroshima.




8. They created life-like victims to show how
their flesh and skins were painfully burnt & melted.




9. One child died on this tricycle.




10. The details of the deadly contents inside the
Atomic Bomb.




11. The uniforms worn by the school children who were
victims of the deadly nuclear.




12. Most victims died instantly. Others within days and months after the atomic disaster.
The radiation was everywhere.




13. Over 53 million people have visited this place! 
They included many Kings, Royalties and Presidents
including our beloved Mother Theresa.
She prayed for world's peace and wrote the message above.





Hiroshima is a very nice and peaceful city today.
My wife loves this place.


SAY "NO" TO NUCLEAR!


****


48 comments:

  1. So...are those cabbage, real argh?? (I also very curious)

    Yea, say no to nuclear, especially to that certain person still testing the nuclear bomb, don't know to what for =.=

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I stared at the plants for so long and thought they looked edible. Still not sure lah.

      The world is getting sick with so much heatwaves ongoing. The annual burning in Indonesia for so many years now remains unsolved. Now the nuclear tests, threats and power greedy countries are questionable. Zzzzzzzz

      Delete
    2. Actually BRIC and US also regularly testing their nuclear explosive power and in much larger scale in deserts and the Pacific. Just that the media only focus on that certain person. We should say no to nuclear to everyone, not just one side >.< ...

      Delete
  2. Yes too, no to nuclear, no to violence and killing

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Nobody can be an island by itself, we all need one another, as for that certain person who is still testing the nuclear bomb, don't know what he or she is thinking

      Delete
    2. You just spoke like a wise person. It is so true that we countries, all need one another in life. Even my blogs too, need all your visits and support. Thank you. LOL LOL

      That moron who tests his nuclear bombs today has chip in the shoulder.

      Delete
  3. Your second picture looks like a big huge giant chocolate cookie without the chocolate chips.. About the gory pictures, I'm ok with that, but the one with the skin burning & melting, I wonder the real victims can still walk around (skin melting wor.. Look at the finger tips there)? I'm sure they would have fainted or something..

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You are always very observant and it really looks like chocolate cookie!! You must be hungry this morning! Wakakaka

      It was winter that day and the skies were gloomy. That's why the green plants turned red & brown like cookies. However that cabbage and other small flower plants survived well.

      I think those burnt victims, limped a while and dropped dead as the fire and heat was too great beyond boiling point. It was a sad museum to visit and I saw many visitors wiping away tears. It made me think a lot.

      Delete
  4. 4. You and your wife didn't come up with cute pose, kakaka....

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Aiyor.... so sad place, I dare not jump happily lah. Wait wait for other posts, and you will see Anay jumped like monkeys!

      Delete
  5. nice museum but i don't like the way Japanese interprete their part of history

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. This museum is to highlight the issues of nuclear dangers and not to point fingers. Would you say US was great in this bombing? I have no comments.

      Delete
  6. Short and meaningful note left by St. Teresa of Calcutta.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. She was the best Saint I could remember and I love all her works & kindness in this lifetime that I was aware.

      Delete
  7. Replies
    1. As for me, I visit most museums. My wife would disappear if the museum is boring with too much ancient exhibits. This one interests and quenched her thirst on the science and nuclear.

      Delete
  8. I hope there is a worldwide ban on nuclear weapons and testings, not just from that certain person but from everyone. I feel the Americans and BRIC are hypocrites to condemn that certain person. Yes he is a moron, but they are much bigger morons. They regularly detonate bombs in the Pacific and in remote lands. No people but still Mother Earth! >.<

    Eh picture 4, you look so f--... double chin just like me wakakaka!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I feel very sad, tired and angry on seeing all these hypocrites throwing powers on the wrong paths. I am aware that the Pacific is their testing playground. I only replied the comments that pointed on the current moron in Pyongyang. Everyday I am glued to the News Channels from China and South Korea where they air all the daily serious island dispute and testings.

      I am already old, so fat is nice and inevitable. It shows I ate plenty lah. You are still young!!!! Sigh! LOL Muahahahaha

      Delete
  9. Replies
    1. Please bang your pots and pans in protests! Thank you.

      If the world is interested in baking and cooking like you, there will be no poverty and wars but Love!

      Delete
  10. The tourists are learning the history of Hiroshima. Hope there is no cover ups to alter the history there.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. They shared how the victims suffered. Need they say more? That's what museums are all about.

      I have to build my guts to visit the other museum in Nanking which has the goriest photos in the world.

      Delete
  11. I feel sadness visiting the memorial park...

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Me too. I have visited the 2 museums and no more.

      Delete
  12. You didn't try the flower and taste whether it's like cabbage? LOL

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I was really tempted to pluck them and eat!!! I must ask Minoru Saito-san whether they are really cabbage.

      Delete
  13. Nice ambiance for a memorial.. it reminded me of Nanjing, the place was also very quiet and neat and when we entered the hall, the dim lights and the display looks very gloomy and kind of sad.. skeletons were placed in a glass wall, those who perished during the grim world world two...

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I have been anxious to visit this one in Nanjing yet my heart is weak with no guts to even see their gory websites. I might faint if I see those photos and skeletons in the exhibits... You were so brave lah!! War is the results of human greed and selfishness.

      Delete
  14. Thanks for the warning. I did not look, just quickly scroll through. Just too sad.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Oh no, others thought the photos were mild. Last time I posted about my visit to Nagasaki and some funny fellas cautioned me for not warning them ahead of the gory photos.

      Delete
  15. are you sure those are cabbages outside the museum, or just some huge blossoms you have never seen before?? Anay should have gone and steal one and hide inside his jacket when you were leaving the museum dei..

    the museum tells the story and the story tells the history.. i guess it is very important to maintain museums so that we do not forget about the past, which could be very good lessons to us as well as our generations to come..

    i don't find those photos and exhibits gory and scary, but instead i am feeling very sad when i look at them even from the photos.. i guess if one were right there in the museum to see the exhibits, he could surely feel the agony of this tragedy in history..

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hey I would never steal anything from anywhere esp foreign countries. Can you imagine Anay getting sentenced to 15 years of hard labour for stealing a Japanese cabbage?? LOL

      I like your smart thoughts on this
      "the museum tells the story and the story tells the history.. "

      I never liked to visit sad museums as my heart would sink below the floor.

      Delete
  16. This is probably one of the few places I intend to skip as this man-made horror of bombing is just too much for me. And to see images and then imagine that it could happen again simply is unacceptable. Japan made a memorial to remind us of what entails hatred and greed and that we should be vessels of peace.

    Those ornamental cabbages are simply delightful. I have seen them here and I wish I could grow them in my yard but they are not for hot weather. Yes, edible but bitter and rubbery.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It seems that many Asians like you would avoid such war museums too. I heard of my friends and relatives who skipped with excuses that why should they go and dig up the pasts! Did I go dig up? I merely went to learn and study some actual facts for my own knowledge. It is so scary to know how devastating the Nuclear Bombs would cause.

      I think Thailand has all the pretty flowers and exotic plants that are grown in foreign land with your nice and cool temperatures.

      Delete
  17. I read through the captions and photos. I never knew the bomb exploded midair before now. I had sudden goosebumps imagining the children who did not survive long. You must feel lucky being able to visit such a globally historical place.

    The museum should be a lesson to learn for today's and future generations.

    By the way, hi, old old friend.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi my old friend! You really surprised me today.. Hope you are doing well and in good health always. I would like to see your blogs again.

      I had a harder time walking inside those war museums. I paid for the entrance fees and had to force myself to read & stare at the gory photos. My heart squirmed and I also had multiple goosebumps!

      Delete
  18. Heart wrenching to see those photos exhibits the deadly cause of nuclear! Wish this kind of history/destruction never repeats anywhere. Neatly preserved museum and its ambiance provoke peace with all the colorful crest of flowers and fountain.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Nobody likes war as it killed many innocent lives and made everyone homeless. Millions of children sadly became orphans overnight.

      Japan is a wonderful country where they built very thoughtful and neat developments & buildings, suitable for the elderly citizens and those with special needs. They also have cleanliness and good landscapes every where.

      Delete
  19. Thanks for sharing some the photos from the museum with us.It is heart wrenching to go through it. Like you said no to nuclear.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It is good that I got to share this museum as not many people would want to visit there.

      Yes we must say "NO" to Nuclear.

      Delete
  20. It was so scary. I pray for no nuclear too. Those bomb cases happening in our neighbor countries make me so phobia to visit them again.

    It was such an eye opening experience for Anay and Letchumy to visit this place.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I also have serious phobia to visit that Southern parts after so many bombings.

      Delete
  21. It's such a tragic, Tan. Remind me of my trip to Nanjing again. Sigh!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Until today, I dare not read the whole post of Nanjing in your blog. I remembered you telling me the link a few years ago after my Nagasaki visit. I looked at the photos and closed it right away. I had no guts.

      I think I will go over to see your Nanjing blogs again today. Wish me luck. LOL

      Delete
  22. No to Nuclear.. If I had the chance, I won't mind visiting this museum.. we read about it and to see it ourselves is more eye-opening and heart wretching! Thanks for sharing.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I agree and have same thoughts that we should visit this world historic disaster if given the chance. Now Brussels has been bombed and it is so scary.

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  23. Replies
    1. Yes we must observe and uphold the World's Peace!

      Delete

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